Data Sources Screening tools are not designed to make diagnoses. They can give e

Data Sources
Screening tools are not designed to make diagnoses. They can give evidence that a problem exists. However, there is no guarantee that one screening tool or even one assessment or type of data will yield the necessary data to inform the addictions professional about a potential treatment plan and next steps. This is why addictions professionals may have to seek multiple (also known as multimodal) data sources from which to elicit sufficient data on an individual.
In this Discussion, you will consider what you might do in a hypothetical situation in which a client’s scores on a screening tool are insufficient for the purposes of interpretation.
To prepare:
Review the article “Screening for Alcohol Problems: What Makes a Test Effective?”
Review the data collected for the diagnostic summary for Jane Roberts (pseudonym “Patty”) in Chemical Dependency Counseling: A Practical Guide, Appendix 6 (pp. 262–263)
Review the Week 4 Introduction scenario featuring Terrence. Terrence is faced with a client, Angela, who is presenting several problems.
Post by Thursday 3/30/17 a 300-word response to the following:
Consider the scenario in the Week 4 Introduction. What sources of data might Terrence collect in order to understand the client’s problems? Explain why you chose each source. Finally, provide a rationale for the number of sources you recommend.
Be specific and use the week’s Learning Resources in your response.
Answer all components in the assignment as there are usually several. These can serve as your headings in APA format. Using these headings will help keep your paper organized, ensure you cover all objectives, and enhance readability. You may find that if you bullet-point these requirements and refer to them as you write, you will address all of the portions of the question.

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